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Postable intersectional social response graphics

I don’t know what else to call these? They’re very specific, what can I say. I made them to post on Pinterest and Twitter. I suppose they’re a little passive aggressive, but I’m not as confrontational as I used to be back in my Flickr heyday, and I like the idea of these perhaps being reusable and less direct than having on-the-spot dialogues. I don’t like making folks feel attacked or making them feel obliged to engage in dialogue. But I don’t mind if they see something I post.

This one is for Pinterest. I admit it, I like tipis. But they are not cool. Consider this a PSA. #cultural appropriation #racism

This one is for Pinterest. I admit it, I like tipis. They’re beautiful. But they are not something white people should use decoratively. Tents are fine, tipis, not fine. Consider this a PSA. #cultural appropriation #racism #interior design

This one is also for Pinterest. I never want to call anyone on these things, and I can't hide or block particular images (I think?). I guess I just wish folks cared more about whether interior designs include corpses. #fur #skin #rug #hide #leather #head #hunting #throw #sheepskin #lambskin

This one is also for Pinterest. I never want to call anyone on these things, and I can’t hide or block particular images (I think?). I guess I just wish folks cared more about whether interior designs include corpses. #fur #skin #rug #hide #leather #throw #sheepskin #wool #sheep #animal #lambskin #vegan #violence #ethics

Dudes, please. Just do this. I shouldn't have to say it. #mansplaining #sexism #patriarchy #privilege #communication #microaggressions #equality #feminism

Dudes, please. Just do this. I shouldn’t have to say it. #mansplaining #sexism #patriarchy #privilege #communication #microaggressions #equality #feminism

I’m going to go post these on Pinterest right now, and will probably continue to do so whenever I’m feeling annoyed by photos of tipis and sheepskins, and whenever I’m getting particularly tired of the #mansplaining.

(I love everyone, by the way. I live by Thanissaro Bhikkhu’s words, “We should regard those who point out our faults as if they were pointing out treasure” and work hard at rooting out and working against my own racist cultural appropriation, my own whitesplaining, and my own oppression of animals of many species, including sweatshop workers and other humans. So call this a cultural critique, not a personal one. Please know that I’m taking issue here with actions and not people, and that I critique my own actions even more critically. These graphics are offered in a spirit of good humor and arty experimentation, as a public way to work out a frustration with something happening in a public forum. Peace and love!)

I have more of these planned, I think. Let me know if you have any intersectional gripes you want drawn / written, or make your own and tell me about them. If you know of other art like this I’d love to hear about it.

And please tell me what you think of these. I’m deciding if I want to be at all negative; I’d been trying so hard to be positive for a while that I was lacking in honesty, but I’m still very much up in the air about it. Thanks for your opinions and ideas!

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Oppression in Games: What are we learning?

Awhile back we got a smart phone for the first time, and I downloaded a game based on the cuteness of its icon. It turned out to be Triple Town, and I got briefly obsessed, even finding it on Facebook when I ran out of credits or points or whatever it is they give you until you have to start paying money to keep playing.

It’s an addictive puzzle game, which is what I found appealing about it. You combine icons to make higher-value icons. But these icons tell a story. They’re not just little jewels or tiles or something. Triple Town is set on land, populated by bears. You combine grass until you have flowers, and you combine those until you have bushes, and those in turn become trees, which then become buildings, and then churches and cathedrals. Along the way you trap the bears, turning them into tombstones. Enough tombstones and you’ve got a church. You encounter “ninja bears” who can move around more freely and block your moves, and you kill them, to turn them into tombstones, too. At some point the game tells you you’ve been working on colonies; there’s a mainland which sends out ships to them to get their resources to bring back to the “Capital City,” where they can be used to build monuments, armaments, and coin-making farms and factories to fund further exploitation of the islands.

So not only was I a bear-killer, I was an imperialist. I got deeply uncomfortable and after a while it wasn’t even my “guilty pleasure” anymore, it was just an addictive thing I felt creepy about. So I stopped playing.

In the back of my mind I wondered about Triple Town. I imagine a lot of people don’t have issues with killing tiny animated bears and stealing their resources; the game is very popular. Were the game producers just idiots, unaware of what they were teaching people? Or were they deliberately brainwashing folks? More