rescue

Meet Sassafras!

Sassafras
This weekend a cute vanilla cat showed up in our driveway. He was super-friendly, coming over to be petted and cuddled. He let our toddler pet him; he let me pick him up and pet his tummy and put him over my shoulder like a baby. He purred deeply. He followed us up and down the driveway.

He was obviously not neutered, and looked like he had some eye issues and I think fleas. His face and tail were scratched up and some fur was missing. He was skinny. And he had tummy troubles, and an uncomfy-looking butt (sorry if this is TMI).

Sassafras

I now knew who had been pooping all over the place for the past week.

It’s been getting cold out at night. I thought of this sociable, lovey cat who really did not feel very good probably being left out in the cold again.
Sassafras

I reasoned that I’d rather worry about a worried human than about this cat having another night out there.

So, I called Tompkins County SPCA and asked if it made sense to bring him in. They said if he was a house cat and someone called in looking for him, they’d give him needed veterinary care and neuter him before giving him back.

All things considered, I think this was the best decision for the cat, and the cat is the one with less power in this situation. I try to side with those with less power. So, sorry human, if you’re out there: your cat has taken a trip to the SPCA and may go up for adoption if he isn’t claimed. : /

Sassafras

I took the liberty of naming this dude Sassafras; it seemed to suit his gregarious nature and appearance, somehow. I know that if he does go up for adoption, he’ll get a wonderful home and a happy life — he’s a lovely, sweet cat who obviously thrives on attention. If I hadn’t brought him in so quickly, I would have fallen in love. I think I already kinda did. Like all cats I’ve encountered and had some connection with, I’ll probably remember him forever.

Sassafras

Good luck, Sassafras. Whether it’s back where you one day came from, or in a new home, may your future be full of clean floors and enticing toys, clawable carpets and scratching posts, delicious food, cool fresh water, open windows in the summertime, lots of play and cuddle sessions, and safe afternoon naps in warm pools of sunlight, in your very own territory, surrounded by your very own human family. I’ll be glad to think of you there, rather than worrying about you roaming our driveway all winter.

Thank you to SPCA of TC for taking in Sassafras and providing his medical care free of charge! I could not help all of these cats without this incredible service and support. If you can, please consider donating to Tompkins County SPCA, Browncoat Cat Rescue, or another local animal rescue or shelter operation. The folks that do this work, and the animals who depend on them, really need us to pitch in. Whether it’s a few dollars, a few hours of your time, or a donation of towels or food, your contributions can make a huge difference.

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A human and a wombat, hanging out

A human and a wombat, hanging out

From ajakwerth on YouTube:

Douglas is an orphaned Wombat who was taken care of at a school camp (where we have been WWOOFing) near Tallangatta in Victoria, Australia. This video is 3 years old so he was just a little baby there! He was meant to be released into the wild someday but since it’s been a long while ago I lost touch with the family who runs the camp…

Broken Bruce

broken bruce the rescued catMy friend Kristin of Browncoat Cat Rescue is trying to raise funds to help get x-rays for a poor kitty named Broken Bruce. His story is so heartbreaking – I really hope that folks will donate to help get him the care he needs. If you can’t donate, please consider sharing this link with your contacts. Thank you!

Here’s his story:

Bruce was found with a severe upper respiratory infection that had caused him to lose the hair around his eyes. (This mask shape is what led to his name.) He has blossomed from a scared and sickly kitten into a wonderfully affectionate and outgoing little guy. While snuggling with his foster mom on the couch, he blissfully rolled over, and off onto the floor. This fall of roughly two feet cost him the use of the left side of his body. A physical exam at the vets led to a diagnosis of at least two hairline fractures. His doctor believes he could have either osteogenesis imperfecta, (the patient does not have normal bone formation leading to soft and fragile bones) or Vitamin D responsive rickets (even in patients with healthy diets, they develop rickets due to problem with calcium metabolism.)

We need to take radiographs of Bruce’s bones to get an idea about whether or not he has normal bone density. Pending the results of the radiographs, he may need further testing to evaluate for other conditions (such as calcium metabolism problems.)

The initial radiographs alone are estimated at $360-$560.

Bruce is currently confined to a small crate to keep him from further injury, but he rarely stirs from his cushion. Please help Bruce, so he can run and play again!

Click here to donate.

UPDATE: A few days after this was posted, poor Bruce passed away. However, his fund is still open; all funds go toward helping orphaned kittens.

Meet Browncoat Cat Rescue!

One of my favorite local people, a dedicated activist who has done more for our area’s cats than anyone else I’ve ever heard of, has launched a new rescue organization! Click here to learn about Browncoat Cat Rescue – and please, donate. Your contributions will support her Trap-Neuter-Return work as well as the care and feeding of the many fosters who are always romping around her place, healing and getting socialized on their way to adoption.

Be sure to “Like” Browncoat Cat Rescue on Facebook!

Holstein calves need safe, happy homes

Here’s an alert from Farm Sanctuary: Their adoption program is in need of support. Whether you can adopt an animal or support the program so that others can step in to provide homes, your efforts will give peace and freedom to animals badly in need of homes.

Farm Sanctuary recently came to the aid of six male Holstein calves, several just days old, who had been abandoned without food or water and left for dead. With much love and care these calves are now thriving, but we are in desperate need of potential adopters for these sweet boys.

Farm Sanctuary operates the country’s largest farm animal rescue and adoption network. Every year, we assist with urgent placement needs — particularly in cruelty cases involving large numbers of animals. When our shelters are full, we depend on compassionate people who want to make a direct difference for a suffering cow, pig, chicken or other farm animal. Since 1986, nearly 3,000 needy farm animals have been given a new beginning — thanks to people all across the country who have room in their hearts and their homes to join our FARM ANIMAL ADOPTION NETWORK (FAAN).

Right now, due to an influx in cruelty cases, we desperately need to grow our FAAN program so that we can continue to help farm animals in need.

Can you help? For more information, please visit Farm Sanctuary’s website.

Farm Sanctuary Fourth of July Pignic

Props to Farm Sanctuary for offering an awesome animal-friendly celebration this Independence Day! If you haven’t yet been to the Sanctuary, I recommend it. Nothing will make you feel better about being vegan than meeting the sweet, beautiful rescued animals that live there.

Celebrate the freedom of rescued farm animals who call Farm Sanctuary home by visiting our New York Shelter this Fourth of July. Farm Sanctuary, the nation’s leading farm animal protection organization, invites the public to attend our annual Fourth of July Pignic, for a compassionate celebration of our nation’s birthday.

This festive, full day event offers free guided tours of the sanctuary, the opportunity to interact with farm animals rescued from cases of cruelty, neglect and abuse, free samples of delicious veggie food and animal-themed arts and crafts for kids.

Tours begin every hour on the hour from 11 am to 3 pm.

WHEN: Sunday, July 4, 2010; 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

WHERE: Farm Sanctuary, 3100 Aikens Rd., Watkins Glen, N.Y. (map)

The Pignic is a free, all-ages event open to the public. No registration is necessary. For further information, please call 607-583-2225 ext. 221 or visit www.farmsanctuary.org!

Farm Sanctuary is the nation’s leading farm animal protection organization. Since incorporating in 1986, Farm Sanctuary has worked to expose and stop cruel practices of the “food animal” industry through research and investigations, legal and institutional reforms, public awareness projects, youth education, and direct rescue and refuge efforts. Farm Sanctuary shelters in Watkins Glen, N.Y., and Orland, Calif., provide lifelong care for hundreds of rescued animals, who have become ambassadors for farm animals everywhere by educating visitors about the realities of factory farming. Additional information can be found at farmsanctuary.org or by calling 607-583-2225.

Farm Sanctuary: A new home for animals rescued from farms

Isadora or Duncan - not sure who! (rescued goat now residing at Farm Sanctuary)I love Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen. I brought busloads of kids there when I worked at Cornell University, both my own age and high schoolers, volunteered there with my partner, and know that those visits have played a pivotal role in my veganism going from something I was “trying out” to something I can’t wait to teach to my future children! There’s something special about meeting the animals that being vegan is benefiting. You can know abstractly that being vegan is helping, but it makes that benefit vastly more visible and real when you go and actually hang out with the chickens and cows and turkeys and pigs and other beautiful, sweet animals running around at Farm Sanctuary.

You can visit the Farm, and sponsor an animal or adopt one. On their website you can donate, find action alerts and volunteer opportunities, and get access to the many educational resources and factory farming photos and videos that they offer.

This goat pictured here is either Isadora or Duncan (I’m not sure who, sorry!), one of two goats who escaped from a live market in NYC. You can read their story here.

Anyone have a favorite memory from a visit to Farm Sanctuary, or an experience adopting or fostering? Please post a comment.