racism

Get Out the Vote poster contest

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please spread the word…
In honor of the 50th Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act…
ACTION (Activists Committed to Interrupting Oppression Now)
is proud to announce our 1st annual
GET OUT THE VOTE Poster Contest
(Deadline: June 16, 2014)
Winning submissions will be displayed throughout our community
to encourage people to register & vote.

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Confession: These are some ways I have been racist

I’ve been wanting to get this said and am sorry it’s taken me so long.

For a short period I was influenced by writings and statements from multiracial people who seemed to look very white, who had more complicated identities and didn’t identify as white. I’m 1/64 Cherokee and have some rumors of Iroquois heritage on my mother’s side, but am mostly Scotch-Irish and Swedish. My grandmother and uncles and cousins in North Carolina have all lived on Cherokee land for generations now. I briefly thought I should honor the small part of me which is Native by trying to reconnect with my tribe, but realized that to be adopted as a Cherokee I’d have to give up my vegan ideals. I then read a lot of stuff about postmodern Native identities and for about a month started publicly calling myself multiracial and two-spirit, since these terms seemed to best describe my blended, trans identity. Since then, I’ve realized that my skin is way too white for me to identify in this way, and I’ve seen that my using these terms was racist and a form of cooptation. I’m very sorry and very aware of my error and wanted to say this publicly in case anyone saw me identifying in these ways; that phase needed an explanation.

There are lots of other ways I’ve been (however unintentionally) racist. Maybe I’ll write more confessions like this one, I don’t know. I don’t mean to draw attention to myself; there are probably better ways of fighting racism and even of addressing this particular wrong. Anyhow, here it is. Sorry.

Postable intersectional social response graphics

I don’t know what else to call these? They’re very specific, what can I say. I made them to post on Pinterest and Twitter. I suppose they’re a little passive aggressive, but I’m not as confrontational as I used to be back in my Flickr heyday, and I like the idea of these perhaps being reusable and less direct than having on-the-spot dialogues. I don’t like making folks feel attacked or making them feel obliged to engage in dialogue. But I don’t mind if they see something I post.

This one is for Pinterest. I admit it, I like tipis. But they are not cool. Consider this a PSA. #cultural appropriation #racism

This one is for Pinterest. I admit it, I like tipis. They’re beautiful. But they are not something white people should use decoratively. Tents are fine, tipis, not fine. Consider this a PSA. #cultural appropriation #racism #interior design

This one is also for Pinterest. I never want to call anyone on these things, and I can't hide or block particular images (I think?). I guess I just wish folks cared more about whether interior designs include corpses. #fur #skin #rug #hide #leather #head #hunting #throw #sheepskin #lambskin

This one is also for Pinterest. I never want to call anyone on these things, and I can’t hide or block particular images (I think?). I guess I just wish folks cared more about whether interior designs include corpses. #fur #skin #rug #hide #leather #throw #sheepskin #wool #sheep #animal #lambskin #vegan #violence #ethics

Dudes, please. Just do this. I shouldn't have to say it. #mansplaining #sexism #patriarchy #privilege #communication #microaggressions #equality #feminism

Dudes, please. Just do this. I shouldn’t have to say it. #mansplaining #sexism #patriarchy #privilege #communication #microaggressions #equality #feminism

I’m going to go post these on Pinterest right now, and will probably continue to do so whenever I’m feeling annoyed by photos of tipis and sheepskins, and whenever I’m getting particularly tired of the #mansplaining.

(I love everyone, by the way. I live by Thanissaro Bhikkhu’s words, “We should regard those who point out our faults as if they were pointing out treasure” and work hard at rooting out and working against my own racist cultural appropriation, my own whitesplaining, and my own oppression of animals of many species, including sweatshop workers and other humans. So call this a cultural critique, not a personal one. Please know that I’m taking issue here with actions and not people, and that I critique my own actions even more critically. These graphics are offered in a spirit of good humor and arty experimentation, as a public way to work out a frustration with something happening in a public forum. Peace and love!)

I have more of these planned, I think. Let me know if you have any intersectional gripes you want drawn / written, or make your own and tell me about them. If you know of other art like this I’d love to hear about it.

And please tell me what you think of these. I’m deciding if I want to be at all negative; I’d been trying so hard to be positive for a while that I was lacking in honesty, but I’m still very much up in the air about it. Thanks for your opinions and ideas!

“It is not a black problem. It is a white problem. This is an American problem. It is a societal problem.”


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Uplifting and learning from the First Black Republic

IBW-haiti-photoI just read the report from Institute of the Black World’s Haiti Support Project Visit (January 15-19, 2014) and wow is it full of good stories and information. Check it out to learn about the past, present, and future of the world’s First Black Republic. There are lots of great photos and videos.

Stop the Jail Expansion!

stop the jail expansion

STOP BUILDING NEW CAGES, WE WANT SCHOOL AND LIVING WAGES

Prison Abolition Workshop

Thursday 2/13 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
GIAC, 301. W. Court Street (Downtown Ithaca)

The move to close prisons in New York has come alongside the push to expand county jails across the state. Within this statewide shift, Tompkins has been one of few counties actively resisting their local jail expansion.

In our attempt to understand what exactly is going on in our state, we will work with Jack Norton, a geographer who studies prison closures in Upstate New York. Learning about the history and geography of mass incarceration in New York will help us better understand our current struggle. Join us in work-shopping abolitionist organizing in Ithaca as we brainstorm messaging for our campaign to stop the Tompkins County Jail expansion, effective tactics, and next steps.

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