NYC

May Day in NYC

may day 2014

Left Labor Project urges you to MAKE THURSDAY A MAY DAY TO REMEMBER

MAY 1, 2014, 5:00 pm, NEW YORK CITY HALL!

Join the NYC Central Labor Council, DC37, 1199, UFT, NYSNA, SEIU 32BJ, and many other union locals along with Domestic Workers United, Taxi Workers Alliance, Make the Road NY,  NY Immigration Coalition, NY Communities for Change, US Labor Against the War NYC, and MANY OTHER LOCAL MOVERS AND SHAKERS!

(See attached flyer for longer list of endorsers)

MAY DAY 2014 demands LABOR RIGHTS, IMMIGRANT RIGHTS, JOBS FOR ALL!

This will be the broadest May Day rally in decades, with the participation of the majority of the city’s unions, and advocates for fair contracts, peace, justice, equality and human rights.

Take 4,5,6 to Brooklyn Bridge, R to City Hall, 2,3 to Park Place, A,C,J to Chambers or Fulton, E, PATH to World Trade.

Look for our Left Labor Party contingent on Broadway and join us!

( Download the flyer here )

Happy May Day,
Larry Moskowitz, Left Labor Project

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Awesome links from awesome people

reverend billy

From Rev. Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir: “Buzz with our HoneyBeeLujah campaign. We will conduct media-genic ‘bee-swarmings’ in and around the property of Monsanto, Bayer, Cargill, and Archer Daniels Midland. We will perform inside big big box stores where bee-killing chemicals are sold to domestic gardeners from the shelf. The Bee-stinger-singers will follow the EXECUTIVES OF THE ABOMINABLE MONOCULTURE – into their lobbies, the parking lots and restaurants. The workers in these hedge funds and chemical companies must be gently exposed to the truth about their pesticide poisons.” Photo credits: John Quilty, Bees by Savitri D with Stop Shopping Choir volunteers, David Yap (tenor), Laura Newman (soprano and soloist) and Dragonfly (soprano and soloist). More info

  • “On April 18th the film 1971 directed by Johanna Hamilton, and produced by former Arts Engine team members, Katy Chevigny and Marilyn Ness, will have its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival.”(More)
  • “Sustainable Tompkins is launching The People’s Salon: Conversations that Matter to Your Future with a shared public inquiry into the climate dilemma. ‘The Climate, the Market, and the Commons’ will be the theme for a series of conversation salons held on Thursday evenings, 7-9 pm, on April 17, May 8, June 5, and June 19 at the Sustainability Center, 111 N. Albany St., Ithaca.” (More)
  • “The moral agency of the Black church must never abandon its claim on an apology and reparations for the protracted crimes against African humanity, during and as a result of the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade.” (More)

From Astraea: “Watch our new video to find out how Astraea’s new global campaign Fueling the Frontlines will bolster grassroots movements for LGBTQI rights and justice. Astraea Executive Director J. Bob Alotta and grantee partner Jabulani C. Pereira, co-founder of Iranti-Org, will tell you about how we are working together towards a world that is safe for LGBTQI people around the globe.”

One of those very rare moments when I regret not living in NYC anymore

Design and Violence Debate: Debate III (MoMA):

Design and Violence is an ongoing online curatorial experiment that explores the manifestations of violence in contemporary society by pairing critical thinkers with examples of challenging design work. Contributors’ weekly essays have been published since November 2013, creating a body of opinion and a set of case studies that spark discussion and bring the ambiguous relationship between design and violence to center stage for designers and the people they serve—all of us.

Design and Violence is organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA; Jamer Hunt, Director, graduate program in Transdisciplinary Design, Parsons The New School for Design; and Michelle Millar Fisher, Exhibition Coordinator, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA.

The third debate will center upon Temple Grandin’s “serpentine ramp,” a slaughterhouse design modification that attempts stress reduction and a more humane death for animals. Professor Gary L. Francione (Distinguished Professor of Law, Rutgers, and author, Eat Like You Care: An Examination of the Morality of Eating Animals) and Nicola Twilley (editor/author of Edible Geography.com, co-founder of the Foodprint Project, and director of Studio-X NYC) will deliver debate motions, moderated by Design and Violence co-curator Paola Antonelli.

Intersectional linkiness

Events:

  • Left Forum 2014: Reform and/or Revolution: Imagining a World with Transformative Justice (May 30-June 1, 2014, NYC):

    “Pressing questions loom for justice-seeking social forces: What is to be done today when a reform brings us one step forward, while leaving other important struggles worse off in the process? What type of movements will it take to overcome such challenges? What type of institutions, systems and societal conditions are possible when transformed conditions of justice no longer take the forms of, ‘the aggrieved speaking to the grievance alleviators’? How do these issues raise the question of the relation of reform to revolution? More than ever, people know that a new and different world is urgently needed. How do we get there from here: reforms, revolution, or strategic combinations of both?”

  • People Links Digital Gatherings (online):

    “Join us on Thursday, March 27th from 6-7pm EST and 4-5 CT-MexDF to discuss technology related violence against women and the tensions that exist between combating hate speech versus the right to freedom of expression.”

  • Socialist Campaign in New York? A Discussion, Hosted by Campaign for a United Socialist Party – CUSP, April 17, 2014, The Brecht Forum, NYC (via Edge Left):

    “Previous meetings focused on the theory; this one is about concrete options. How do campaigns work? Should we learn by working on Howie Hawkins’ campaign for governor? Should we run open socialists? Now, in a few years, or when? What opportunities to run exist between 2014 and 2018? Will running candidates interfere with important movement work? How do we approach nationwide formations? This event is an open discussion and organizing meeting, so it will involve “audience” participation more than typical events. Bring your thoughts, listen to others, and focus on the nuts-and-bolts of what we will actually do.”

  • A New York that works for all of us Rally in Albany, NY, March 20, 2014 (via Edge Left):

    “We stand for a NY that works for all of us but today, Albany works for the super-rich and powerful corporations. If it favors the wealthy and CEO campaign contributors, it’s sure to pass in Albany. On the other hand, common sense legislation the majority of New Yorkers believe in, is stalled by politics. It doesn’t have to be this way. We can do better. On March 20th we are going to hold our elected officials in Albany responsible for putting people ahead of campaign contributors. We demand that our basic democratic rights be respected.”

Things to read:

  • Edward Snowden’s Testimony to the European Parliament on NSA Spying and its Consequences:

    Snowden’s testimony is vitally important for every citizen in every country to understand, yet it has barely been covered by the commercial or (non-commercial) global media. At stake is the possibility of individuals and organizations (not just the media) to function as checks on executive power. It also demonstrates the ability of a secret agency to become an executive power, able even to control the spy services of foreign countries.

  • Heroic Imagination Project:

    “Headquartered in San Francisco, California, The Heroic Imagination Project was founded by Dr. Philip Zimbardo, Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Stanford University. At HIP, we translate the extensive research findings of social psychology and related fields into meaningful insights and tools that individuals can use in their everyday lives to transform negative situations and create positive change. Dr. Zimbardo’s work has studied the psychological foundations of negative forms of social influence (such as conformity, obedience, and the bystander effect) and is now refocused on understanding the nature of everyday heroism and they psychology of personal and social growth.”

Occupy activist assaulted by police, being charged with assaulting the police

Oh this is just too much. Really, NYPD?

Today – Thurs. February 13 – Jury Selection
Part 31, Room 1333 @ 100 Centre St., Manhattan

Tentative trial schedule:
Friday, February 14th – Opening Arguments & Prosecution case
Wednesday, February 19th – Defense begins
More

Love wins

Watch what happens when a subway “preacher” tries to spread his heterosexism and homophobia and hate: A gay subway passenger stands up for himself and gets the whole car cheering for him by saying, “Jesus loves me!… Jesus is love! We can hear your falsehoods! There’s love in this train!… Love wins!”

I love this video for two reasons:

  1. It really reminds me of the usefulness of speaking to people in their own language, and to respect that they may be different from ourselves. Dominion: The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy by Matthew Scully is an incredible book written by one of George W. Bush’s speechwriters, a conservative republican and a conservationist, not an abolitionist intersectional vegan by any means! However, his arguments have been enormously helpful to me in speaking with people who firmly believe that humans have God-given dominion over animals. I may not agree, and I might not define god in the same way they do, but I am now able to have an intelligent conversation with a right wing Christian carnist, in which I can respectfully quote all the compassionate Bible verses needed to counter the bloodthirsty ones they might feel attached to. Imagine what a different response this gay guy would have gotten if he’d said instead, “Your religion is oppressive and your Bible is lies!” By saying “Jesus is love” he effectively showed that the “preacher” was indeed a “false prophet,” at least, in the eyes of all of the people who were watching and who also want to believe that God, if s/he exists, is good and loving, and not hateful. Who are you going to agree with – the crazy bigot screaming vitriol, or the brave young man countering hatred with a reminder of Jesus’s love? I’m agnostic and more Buddhist than anything, but I’m still voting for the young man. Amen, brother.
  2. The other reason I love this video is because once Shira and I were on the train in NYC, and an old man and woman sat down across from us with Christian-themed baseball caps on, and started hissing hateful words at us, saying we were going to hell. We didn’t know how to defend ourselves. No one said anything in our defense. It was one of the cruelest, saddest experiences of my life. I wished dearly at the time that they could have seen me as a peace and justice activist, an ethical person who practices nonviolence in my every action, a loving person in a committed and healthy relationship, a community-minded voter and taxpayer, a fellow Brooklynite. Instead they saw something disgusting they wanted to destroy. It broke my heart. So I want to thank the young man in this video for his courage, for standing up and saying what I didn’t say. Love wins.

I also want to thank my freshman year roommate, Mer, and another one of our dorm-mates, Jesse, for having the courage to stand up one night at dinner, proclaiming, “I love Jesus!” It shocked me at the time because I hadn’t seen anyone progressive, any non-bigot, say something like that before, so exuberantly and honestly and earnestly, and from such a beautiful place of open-hearted love. If it wasn’t for those two people, and the influence of Hugh and his stories of radical Catholics (thank you Hugh!), I wouldn’t have come around to where I am now. My family has been wounded in the past by unjust and oppressive interpretations of religious scripture, and it’s taken me some time to get over my prejudice against religions and to find God in my own way. (Thanks to Josh A. for help in that department!)

Via Gawker