Vegetables are good for you

  • A Washington Post food critic has come out as a vegetarian (not vegan, mind you, heavens no!), with lots of excuses and worries, making me aware of how biased food writers apparently are toward animal products. I’d been ignoring them for so long I hadn’t thought much about it. How weird, that a food critic should be so afraid to openly reduce the suffering that he or she is causing. It’s a good thing. You don’t have to be ashamed to eat fewer dead things.
  • Avoiding chemicals is hard, but eating a lot of relatively unprocessed vegetables is probably a smart move.
  • Processed Meat Raises Risk Of Dying From Cancer And Heart Disease, Study Finds, recalling earlier studies finding the same conclusion
  • The Partnership for a Healthier America, Let’s Move!, and USDA’s MyPlate came together to offer “healthy” recipes to folks on Pinterest. Disappointingly, they focus mostly on meat and put vegetarian food last. Because who needs science!
  • Check Happy Cow to find good vegan food near you – you can search by ZIP code or town. It’s really useful for roadtrips, too. (They recently redesigned their site, so check it out if you haven’t been there in a while!)

Human News

A sandwich that’s bad for everybody

Have you heard about this secret menu at McDonalds? How about the McGangBang? I hadn’t heard of it until the other day when it was mentioned casually in a slideshow of other fast food secret menu items on Huffington Post. Personally, I can’t imagine wanting such a thing, even back when I was an 18-year-old dedicated carnivore: Something about the name just feels wrong.

Thankfully, the fine feminist folks at Shakesville have done a great job of pointing out the sexism implicit in this sandwich name — a sandwich which, I’d like to point out, is neither good for women, or animals, or the men to whom this kind of thing is marketed (and who this kind of food is harming, with all of its saturated fat, cholesterol, and other nastiness).

How Oscar Mayer and Kraft Used Salt, Fat and Sugar to Hook Kids on Lunchables

Hear Michael Moss on Democracy Now, speaking about how Oscar Mayer and Kraft used clever marketing to get kids hooked on unhealthy products. Creepy story! If they had this playing next to every Lunchables display in every supermarket, no one would ever buy them again. That’s probably not going to happen any time soon, but we can sure share this video.

Via LiveVegan on Facebook