immigration

Here’s to a future with no borders

Yesterday was July 4th. I admit I find fireworks (and crowds) overwhelming, and was relieved to be in bed with my wife and baby as the pyrotechnic thudding and loud, distant music did their thing.

But yesterday I felt what I’ve only begun to feel in the past few years, as my understanding of our country and the way we fit into the world has deepened: Pride. I feel proud to be American, and happy to be here. I love that I can be gay, and trans, and married to a woman. I’m bothered that there are still a lot of ways in which I’m a second class citizen but those are increasingly due to my status as an Earthling and a woman and a trans person and a vegan pacifist unaffiliated with any major religion, and not my status as an American. It turns out that 2013 is beginning to be a pretty good time to be queer in America. For the first time I’m really starting to feel like America doesn’t mind that I’m here, and maybe even values my family’s contributions to and presence in society.

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“The Rhetoric of Criminality: Mass Incarceration and the Marginalization of People of Color

Students for Justice in Palestine, Cornell Black Student’s United, and Movemiento Estudiantil Chicano/Chicana Aztlan present:

The Rhetoric of Criminality: Mass Incarceration and the Marginalization of People of Color.

Wednesday, February 12, 2014
6:00-8:00 pm
Uris Hall G01
Free and open to the public
Sponsored by the GPSAFC

As of 2013, there are approximately 2 million prisoners in the US today, constituting nearly a quarter of the worldwide prison population. Of these 2 million, a disconcerting proportion of inmates are minorities and persons of color. Why is it that one in three African American men in their twenties are incarcerated on any given day? How has the war on terror affected Arab and Muslim communities in the US? Have the new immigration laws led to an upswing in incarcerated immigrants? This student-run teach-in will not only address all these questions, but will also explore how the US government, private corporations and the justice system perpetuate and benefit from the mass incarceration of people of color.

RSVP on Facebook.