adoption

Upcoming in Ithaca

Some folks I know are having some interesting events, coming up soon(ish) in Ithaca. Check these out and please share the links! Thanks.

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Meet Sassafras!

Sassafras
This weekend a cute vanilla cat showed up in our driveway. He was super-friendly, coming over to be petted and cuddled. He let our toddler pet him; he let me pick him up and pet his tummy and put him over my shoulder like a baby. He purred deeply. He followed us up and down the driveway.

He was obviously not neutered, and looked like he had some eye issues and I think fleas. His face and tail were scratched up and some fur was missing. He was skinny. And he had tummy troubles, and an uncomfy-looking butt (sorry if this is TMI).

Sassafras

I now knew who had been pooping all over the place for the past week.

It’s been getting cold out at night. I thought of this sociable, lovey cat who really did not feel very good probably being left out in the cold again.
Sassafras

I reasoned that I’d rather worry about a worried human than about this cat having another night out there.

So, I called Tompkins County SPCA and asked if it made sense to bring him in. They said if he was a house cat and someone called in looking for him, they’d give him needed veterinary care and neuter him before giving him back.

All things considered, I think this was the best decision for the cat, and the cat is the one with less power in this situation. I try to side with those with less power. So, sorry human, if you’re out there: your cat has taken a trip to the SPCA and may go up for adoption if he isn’t claimed. : /

Sassafras

I took the liberty of naming this dude Sassafras; it seemed to suit his gregarious nature and appearance, somehow. I know that if he does go up for adoption, he’ll get a wonderful home and a happy life — he’s a lovely, sweet cat who obviously thrives on attention. If I hadn’t brought him in so quickly, I would have fallen in love. I think I already kinda did. Like all cats I’ve encountered and had some connection with, I’ll probably remember him forever.

Sassafras

Good luck, Sassafras. Whether it’s back where you one day came from, or in a new home, may your future be full of clean floors and enticing toys, clawable carpets and scratching posts, delicious food, cool fresh water, open windows in the summertime, lots of play and cuddle sessions, and safe afternoon naps in warm pools of sunlight, in your very own territory, surrounded by your very own human family. I’ll be glad to think of you there, rather than worrying about you roaming our driveway all winter.

Thank you to SPCA of TC for taking in Sassafras and providing his medical care free of charge! I could not help all of these cats without this incredible service and support. If you can, please consider donating to Tompkins County SPCA, Browncoat Cat Rescue, or another local animal rescue or shelter operation. The folks that do this work, and the animals who depend on them, really need us to pitch in. Whether it’s a few dollars, a few hours of your time, or a donation of towels or food, your contributions can make a huge difference.

Help reduce predation by cats – adopt a baby feral!

browncoat-adoption-event
You can help minimize damage on local ecosystems by feral cats, by helping to reduce feral cat populations. A great way to do that is to adopt socialized feral babies and to attempt to feed them more responsibly than they can feed themselves. All three of our cats were once ferals (from Brooklyn), and they’re now very happy housecats.

To adopt a new kitty friend right here in Ithaca, go to Browncoat Cat Rescue’s Adoption Event at Ithaca Grain and Pet Supply at 1011 W Seneca, Ithaca, NY on Saturday, September 28 starting at 10:00am:

28 Cats and Kittens available for adoption on September 28th! Come and meet the kitties, and learn about fostering/adopting. Homemade goodies will be provided!

Click here to learn more about Browncoat Cat Rescue and click here to share and RSVP to the adoption event listing on Facebook.

Humans have a really weird relationship with other animals.

Do we love them or hate them? Do we respect them or not? Are we troubled enough by the inconsistent and sometimes exploitative and violent ways we treat them, to change our actions? More

Doggy Talk

Last week a man named Michael Upchurch was doing his route on the back of a garbage truck in Muncie, Indiana, when he heard someone crying. He found a six-week-old puppy in a recycling bag: “This ole’ doggy here hollering, ‘Save me.’ I guess in doggy talk.” More

If only every dog were so loved

If only every dog were so loved

In Petsami’s “Dog Eat Dog”, watch the crazy true story of Zachary Quinto adopting his first dog companion at an LA animal shelter. As a bonus, the original soundtrack features some great trumpet and tuba. My big takeaway from this charming little film: If every animal were this loved, we’d be living in a beautiful new world. Adopt, don’t buy, everybody!

Via Jezebel

Holstein calves need safe, happy homes

Here’s an alert from Farm Sanctuary: Their adoption program is in need of support. Whether you can adopt an animal or support the program so that others can step in to provide homes, your efforts will give peace and freedom to animals badly in need of homes.

Farm Sanctuary recently came to the aid of six male Holstein calves, several just days old, who had been abandoned without food or water and left for dead. With much love and care these calves are now thriving, but we are in desperate need of potential adopters for these sweet boys.

Farm Sanctuary operates the country’s largest farm animal rescue and adoption network. Every year, we assist with urgent placement needs — particularly in cruelty cases involving large numbers of animals. When our shelters are full, we depend on compassionate people who want to make a direct difference for a suffering cow, pig, chicken or other farm animal. Since 1986, nearly 3,000 needy farm animals have been given a new beginning — thanks to people all across the country who have room in their hearts and their homes to join our FARM ANIMAL ADOPTION NETWORK (FAAN).

Right now, due to an influx in cruelty cases, we desperately need to grow our FAAN program so that we can continue to help farm animals in need.

Can you help? For more information, please visit Farm Sanctuary’s website.