Oppression

June 26: Understanding Human Rights workshop

This highly interactive and inspiring workshop gives an overview of a human rights framework and helps participants think freshly about our obligations and responsibilities as citizens as well as the obligations of our institutions and organizations. Participants will leave with new ideas and hopefully, new inspiration for yourself, your organization, and our community as a whole for both promoting, exercising and protecting the human rights of everyone.

Workshop details:
Date: June 26, 2014
Time-9am-1pm
Location-Unitarian Church Parlor
Cost: $50.00 (limited number of scholarships are available)
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Help girls surf the crimson wave

Days For Girls Sewing Event, May 16-17th at All Saints Church in Lansing: Help make cloth pads for young women to use when they’re menstruating.

What if not having sanitary supplies meant DAYS without school, DAYS without income, DAYS without leaving the house? Girls use leaves, mattress stuffing, newspaper, corn husks, rocks, anything they can find…but still miss up to 2 months of school every year. Worse, girls are often exploited in exchange for hygiene. It turns out this issue is a surprising but instrumental key to social change for women all over the world. The poverty cycle can be broken when girls stay in school.

Can’t sew? No problem! “Non-sewers can help cut and iron or donate toward the 100% cotton and flannel fabrics that we will use.”

Download the poster here.

Wednesday, 4/30, from 8-10 a.m. Kim Bobo of Interfaith Worker Justice Speaks in Ithaca: Working and Still Poor: What’s Going on in America and What We Can Do About It

From Tompkins County Workers’ Center:

Labor-Religion Coalition of the Finger Lakes & Catholic Charities
16th Religious Leaders’ Breakfast Briefing
“WORKING and STILL POOR: What’s Going on in America and What We Can Do about It” featuring KIM BOBO of Interfaith Worker Justice
Wednesday, APRIL 30, 2014, breakfast beginning at 8am
TEMPLE BETH EL, 402 No. Tioga St, Ithaca

PLEASE RSVP if you can make this event

Kim Bobo is the author of Wage Theft in America and co-author of Organizing for Social Change. She is also the Founder/Executive Director of Interfaith Worker Justice (iwj.org), a national labor rights organization supported by many national labor unions and faith-affiliated organizations. Her work has greatly raised awareness of the prevalence of wage theft in America, particularly among low income workers. Bobo has also been working closely with the TCWC and Just Economics in Asheville, NC, to take our Living Wage Employer Certification Program nationally. The TCWC is also an affiliate of Interfaith Worker Justice’s Workers’ Center Network.

Bobo will also be appearing in the afternoon at SUNY Cortland on April 30th and Binghamton on May 1st (see details on Binghamton visit at http://www.cnylabor.org/index.cfm?action=article&articleID=d9afec95-28ca-4ac1-9687-fd6e7647879e

One of those very rare moments when I regret not living in NYC anymore

Design and Violence Debate: Debate III (MoMA):

Design and Violence is an ongoing online curatorial experiment that explores the manifestations of violence in contemporary society by pairing critical thinkers with examples of challenging design work. Contributors’ weekly essays have been published since November 2013, creating a body of opinion and a set of case studies that spark discussion and bring the ambiguous relationship between design and violence to center stage for designers and the people they serve—all of us.

Design and Violence is organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA; Jamer Hunt, Director, graduate program in Transdisciplinary Design, Parsons The New School for Design; and Michelle Millar Fisher, Exhibition Coordinator, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA.

The third debate will center upon Temple Grandin’s “serpentine ramp,” a slaughterhouse design modification that attempts stress reduction and a more humane death for animals. Professor Gary L. Francione (Distinguished Professor of Law, Rutgers, and author, Eat Like You Care: An Examination of the Morality of Eating Animals) and Nicola Twilley (editor/author of Edible Geography.com, co-founder of the Foodprint Project, and director of Studio-X NYC) will deliver debate motions, moderated by Design and Violence co-curator Paola Antonelli.

Confession: These are some ways I have been racist

I’ve been wanting to get this said and am sorry it’s taken me so long.

For a short period I was influenced by writings and statements from multiracial people who seemed to look very white, who had more complicated identities and didn’t identify as white. I’m 1/64 Cherokee and have some rumors of Iroquois heritage on my mother’s side, but am mostly Scotch-Irish and Swedish. My grandmother and uncles and cousins in North Carolina have all lived on Cherokee land for generations now. I briefly thought I should honor the small part of me which is Native by trying to reconnect with my tribe, but realized that to be adopted as a Cherokee I’d have to give up my vegan ideals. I then read a lot of stuff about postmodern Native identities and for about a month started publicly calling myself multiracial and two-spirit, since these terms seemed to best describe my blended, trans identity. Since then, I’ve realized that my skin is way too white for me to identify in this way, and I’ve seen that my using these terms was racist and a form of cooptation. I’m very sorry and very aware of my error and wanted to say this publicly in case anyone saw me identifying in these ways; that phase needed an explanation.

There are lots of other ways I’ve been (however unintentionally) racist. Maybe I’ll write more confessions like this one, I don’t know. I don’t mean to draw attention to myself; there are probably better ways of fighting racism and even of addressing this particular wrong. Anyhow, here it is. Sorry.

Help needed for Ithaca-based Queer Conference

To the Ithaca community,

We are a committee of Cornell students interested in planning an Ithaca-based regional queer conference for the next academic year. We are making an open call for anyone in the larger Ithaca community to become involved with the planning and implementation of this conference. There are many ways you can get involved! If you’re interested, please fill out this survey (http://goo.gl/uIykV9) by March 30th at 11:59pm (if this message reaches you after that date, please fill it out anyways! We want to hear from you!). After we receive responses, we will schedule an open planning meeting during the second weekend of April. The easiest way to help, however, is to forward this message along. We hope you can help us spread the word that way!

The conference is expected to be hosted at the Cornell campus and run from a chosen Friday night until the following Sunday evening. It will include activists, speakers and performers from the local, regional and larger communities, and it will be open to all, regardless of sex, gender, sexuality, age, class, (dis)ability status, citizenship or any other aspect. Some of the goals of the conference are:

– To include, welcome and represent all forms of queerness. By queerness we understand all kinds of divergences from norms around sex, gender, sexuality, intimacy, pleasure, love, relationships, family and kinship.

– To create a safe space for queer people in the area to meet each other and share their knowledge and experiences.

– To address intersecting and hierarchical forms of oppression as they play out within and without the queer community.

– To create an environment conducive to critical examination of ourselves, our communities and the larger society.

Once again, please let us know if you would like to be involved. This is an intersectional and inclusive conference, and we think it is necessary to represent as many diverse backgrounds and perspectives as possible, so we can together create a safe and long-awaited space in our region that caters to the needs of the queer community at large.

For any questions, e-mail ithacaqueer@gmail.com.

Looking forward to hearing from you,

Bailey Dineen
Betrearon Getachew Tezera
Justin Kondrat
Nathan Gelb-Dyller
Sam Naimi
Stephanie Hobbs
Xiana García Freire